Forex Trading For Beginners (Ful…

VIP EAP Mentorship Prog…

A Letter to My People: Reflectio…

26th Annual Flanigan Le…

Hidden Stimulus - The SBA Will P…

There’s a section of th…

Morning trade. Making £200 on US…

Live FOREX and Bitcoin …

Managing Business Relationships …

More information: https…

Black Conservatives Clash With …

Candace Owens fresh fro…

I Tried Forex Day Trading for a …

I Tried Forex Day Tradi…

Lands of Promise and Peril: Seth…

Professors Seth Lunine …

Seattle Southside Chamber's SMAR…

On Friday, June 19, 202…

Market Nears A Top (Stock Market…

►Subscribe to Our Resea…

«
»

Social Reproduction, Care, and Essential Labor

A teach-in on the new forms of organizing that have been spurred by the sudden visibility of care workers, featuing Dean Spade, Patricia Lopez, Antwanette Lyons, Maggie Dickinson, Suzanne Adley, and Corrina Chase.

This is the second installment in a four-part teach-in series, co-sponsored by Verso Books and the Relational Poverty Network, entitled Thinking and Organizing Beyond the Pandemic: A Relational Poverty Toolkit.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS:

Patricia Lopez is an assistant professor of geography at Dartmouth College. Her work centers on questions of care and care ethics, with attention to health geographies.

Antwanette Lyons is a Care Coordinator at the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic, a pediatric, primary care clinic of Seattle Children’s Hospital, where patients receive medical, dental, mental health, and nutrition services regardless of income or financial situation.

Maggie Dickinson is an anthropologist and assistant professor at Guttman Community College, City University of New York, and author of “Feeding the Crisis: Care and Abandonment in America’s Growing Food Safety Net.”

Suzanne Adley is the co-Director of the Food Chain Workers Alliance, a global human rights lawyer with the National Lawyers Guild, and a long-time Arab community organizer.

Dean Spade is a poverty lawyer, professor at Seattle University, and organizer active since the mid-1990s in movements working to end poverty, war, imprisonment, and border enforcement. He is the author of “Normal Life: Administrative Violence, Critical Trans Politics and the Limits of Law,” and his most recent work explores the political work of mutual aid.

Corrina Chase is a co-founder and organizer with the Portland COVID-19 Mutual Aid Network, a community organization that employs collective power to deliver necessities and respond to requests for material assistance from the Portland community.

The Relational Poverty Network convenes an international community of scholars, teachers, policy makers, and activists working within and beyond academia to develop conceptual frameworks, research methodologies, and pedagogies that shift from thinking about “the poor and poor others” to relationships of power and privilege. They work across boundaries to foster a transnational, comparative and interdisciplinary approach to poverty research that involves multidirectional theory building and incorporates marginalized voices to build innovative concepts for poverty research.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *