Staring A Business On Poshmark |…

I have been selling clo…

Code Switch: Elevating the Exper…

OpenHub and Newburgh Fr…

How Do We Make Sense of Civil Un…

Denise Rodgers, MD, FAA…

How I Manage My Finances in my 2…

In this video, I talk a…

LIVE Market Coverage: Wednesday …

Get the latest up-to-th…

My Thoughts On The Future Of Inv…

My thoughts on the futu…

The Five Types Of Buyers To Know…

When selling a business…

COVID-19 Virtual Series Week 3: …

A huge thank you to the…

Conversation about Race with Der…

As a firm, we reject ra…

personal finance 101, personal f…

personal finance 101, p…

«
»

Duke Decolonizing Global Health | Theories, Methods, Language

While global health aims to reduce health disparities and inequity, the methods and tools currently used in global health were developed through the exploitation of colonized and enslaved communities. These systems of inequality persist today in the field of global health. Coloniality is defined as the matrix of power relations that continually manifests transnationally and individually despite the achievement of political independence. This panel will explore how the architecture of coloniality informs and impacts our contemporary system of global health, including our theories, methods, and language. The panel will challenge us to ask: how can we as practitioners learn, know, teach and ‘do’ global health based on the kind of system we want to see, not the one that we currently have?

Global Health Histories Seminar 140: Theories, Methods, Language

Moderator: Kearsley Stewart, PhD – Professor of Global Health at Duke University

Panelists
Walter Mignolo, PhD is a professor of Literature and Romance Studies at Duke University. His research and teaching have been devoted, in the past 30 years, to understanding and unraveling the historical foundation of the modern/colonial world system and imaginary since 1500. In his research, modern/colonial world system and imaginary is tantamount with the historical foundation of Western Civilization and its expansion around the globe. His research stands on four basic premises: a) the there is no world-system before 1500 and the integration of America in the Western Christian (European) imaginary; b) that the world-system generated the idea of “newness” (the New World) and of modernity and c) that there is no modernity without coloniality—coloniality is constitutive no derivative of modernity; d) the modern/colonial imaginary was mounted and maintained on the invention of the Human and Humanity that provided the point of reference for the invention of racism and sexism together with the invention of nature.

Meleckidzedeck Khayesi, PhD is a Technical Officer in the Social Determinants of Health Department at the World Health Organization. He was born in Vihiga District, Kenya. He is a human geographer with a Bachelor of Education degree (1988), a Master of Arts Degree in Geography (1992) and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Transport Geography (1999). The three degrees were done at Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya. He has extensive research experience in road safety and transport. Dr. Khayesi joined the Social Determinants of Health Department, up to recently known as Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention (NVI), in March 2002, after being a lecturer at Kenyatta University for 11 years. He facilitates development, implementation and evaluation of road safety programmes in countries and road safety capacity development.

Amy Locklear Hertel, MSW, JD, PhD is Chief of Staff to the Chancellor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Clinical Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work. Her research area is asset building in tribal communities and her holistic approach is informed by the worldview of the communities she engages. Her applied research is designed to inform the development of tribal programs, policies, and interventions that promote Native health, wealth, and wellbeing. Dr. Locklear Hertel approach to community engagement promotes tribal self-determination, capacity building, partnership development, and inclusion. Formerly, as Director of the UNC American Indian Center, she partnered with faculty across a multitude of disciplines in social work, public health, public policy, law, and government.

Madhukar Pai, MD, PhD is a Canada Research Chair in Epidemiology & Global Health at McGill University, Montreal. Dr. Pai is the Director of McGill Global Health Programs, and Director of the McGill International TB Centre. His research is mainly focused on improving the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis, especially in high-burden countries like India and South Africa. His research is supported by grant funding from the Gates Foundation, Grand Challenges Canada, and Canadian Institutes of Health Research. He has more than 300 publications. He is recipient of the Union Scientific Prize, Chanchlani Global Health Research Award, Haile T. Debas Prize, and David Johnston Faculty & Staff Award. He is a member of the Royal Society of Canada, and a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *